Mon. Nov 18th, 2019

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Demonstrators demand to know whereabouts of missing protestors

3 min read

(3 Nov 2019) LEAD IN:
In the capital of Khartoum, protesters called on authorities to step up an investigation into the hundreds of people who went missing on June 3.
Demonstrators are also demanding the disbanding of Sudan’s former ruling party that underpinned President Omar al-Bashir’s three decades in power.

STORY-LINE:
Thousands of protesters take to Khartoum’s streets.
They are demanding the authorities step up an investigation into the hundreds of people that went missing following demonstrations earlier this year.
Carrying posters of the missing people, they march towards the office of the country’s chief prosecutor, Taj al-Ser Ali al-Hebr.
They are here to present him with a memorandum with written demands for a new investigation by an independent committee.
“We took to the streets today for rights of the missing people because it is a humanity case more than it is a criminal case,” says protester Ahmed Othman.
“This is a case that concerns the whole society, not only the families of the missing.”
The march continues towards Nile street, where they will hold a silent protest to honour those killed during the protests.
Protesters already rejected the results of the prosecutor’s investigation in September.
It said the country’s ruling generals did not order the deadly break-up and blamed the deaths on paramilitary forces who exceeded their orders.
According to the protesters, at least 128 people were killed and hundreds went missing.
Authorities put the death toll at 87, including 17 inside the sit-in area.
Setting up an independent probe into the crackdown was a key point in the transition deal between the military and civilian leaders signed in August.
Demonstrators also want the disbanding of Sudan’s former ruling party that underpinned President Omar al-Bashir’s three decades in power.
Sunday’s protests were called by local groups linked with the Sudanese Professionals’ Association (SPA), which spearheaded countrywide demonstrations that toppled al-Bashir in April.
There were no reports of any clashes with police or casualties during the protests.
The country is now ruled by a joint military-civilian administration, which must navigate a delicate path towards eventual democratic elections in just over three years time.
The SPA has repeatedly called for the appointment of regional governors and the formation of a legislative body.
Creating an interim parliament was part of a power-sharing agreement signed in August between pro-democracy protesters and the country’s powerful military.
The transitional government previously said it won’t appoint governors or the legislative body until it makes peace with the country’s rebel groups.
The government and the rebel leaders wrapped up the first round of peace talks in October in South Sudan’s capital, and are to resume their negotiations later this month.
The country is now ruled by a joint military-civilian administration, which must navigate a delicate path toward eventual democratic elections in just over three years.

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